Featured Products
Our Super Survival Pack
Our Super Survival Pack
4 collections and 2 pints of grain
Our Spring Security Collection
Our Spring Security Collection
5 packets
Waltham Butternut Squash
Waltham Butternut Squash
Winter squash for boiling or baking, excellent keeper.
25 seeds
Detroit Dark Red Beet
Detroit Dark Red Beet
Sweet robust flavor. Delicious greens. Excellent for canning.
400 seeds

Articles

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The corn that we sell at Seed for Security, was bred here on our farm years ago, before GMO seeds were available. Our farm is surrounded by tall mature hardwood forest land. Our corn germination rate is 95% this year. Every year I grow more corn to have a steady fresh supply of seed. According to Suzanne Ashworth, in her book Seed to Seed, Flint corn will retain a high germination rate for up...
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Since it does take some time to soak, cook and simmer Boston Baked Beans, why not cook larger batches and freeze or can some of them for later meals? The usual recipe calls for soaking the dry beans in water over night. Change the water a couple times. Then cook the beans by boiling hard for an hour or two. To save a lot of both cooking time and fuel use a pressure cooker for 30 minutes instead. I...
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Native Americans all across the USA planted these three crops for a very good reason. By combining them in there diet they had a base of complete nutrition. It is not just any kind of beans. corn and squash. You need to grow mature dry beans, corn as a grain and winter keeping squash. String beans, sweet corn and summer squash will not do. Neither beans or corn develop protein until fully mature...
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Whether you are planting a garden this year or saving seeds for a future garden you need the freshest seed available. All seeds do have a shelf life and deteriorate over time. Start with recently harvested seed which is the freshest seed available. When saving seed for long term storage Buy fresh seed to start with. Store fully dry seeds in a cool, dry location. Freeze seeds for the longest...
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If you are saving seeds to plant in next years garden you do! For example - All squash varieties are outbreeding which means they are insect pollinated. Squashes are divided into 6 different species and different varieties within the same species will cross readily. Crossing however does not occur between the different species. So what in the world does that all mean? O.K. say you plant Buttercup...
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Here in New England, Fall is the Harvest season when we get ready for the long Winter ahead. There is great satisfaction as each thing we need is stocked up. It is such a great feeling to look into a full cupboard, see a large wood pile or know our fuel tanks are full. Seeds and herbs drying here and there around the house are a delight and bring real security. Learn now to save your own seeds and...
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Millet is seldom grown for food in North America, but it is widely grown to eat in the rest of the world. This healthy food crop is easy to grow and prepare for the table at home. Once your soil has warmed up well this grain will grow quickly and be ready in 60 to 90 days. While growing it does not look like a food crop at all. That makes it ideal to plant not only at home but also near a...
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Be sure to click on the word 'Videos' on the home page and see all our videos. Because my business is small and home based I am able to pay attention to minute details. Many of Seed for Security seeds are grown on our farm. You can not get fresher than that! I harvest, dry and hand pack my seeds. Great care goes into selecting the varieties of seed that I sell. We offer vegetable seeds that will...
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I made and bottled a batch of mostly Concord grapes into grape juice. This is an easy way to prepare fruit to keep on the shelf. It was still harvest time so I was very busy. Just one of the quart jars is just enough to make a batch of grape jelly later when I will have more time and a hot stove is even more welcome in our kitchen. The night before, I put enough clean jars in the oven, and turned...
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Be sure to stop by our Video section from the home page and see "Harvesting Flint Indian Corn" According to Suzanne Ashworth*, in her excellent book 'Seed to Seed' Flint corn seed keeps 'for 5-10 years '. I continue to highly recommend her detailed seed saving book. This figure is for seed storage in a cool dry room, not sealed in aluminized poly bags with a desiccant, which is the way we pack...
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The usual time of year to make sauerkraut in Connecticut is in the late Fall. After a few frosts, the huge heads of cabbage are a little sweeter and more tender. But mid Summer is a good time to make sauerkraut too. You will need more heads of cabbage since each one is smaller, but they are tender and and have more juices in them. The warmer Summer temperatures make fermenting faster and the room...
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My customers keep asking me how many acres does our Super Survival Pack plant. Well, that depends on how closely you plant your seeds. I calculated plant spacing, following recommended measurements, and came up with a little over a 1/6 of an acre. There are 4 pounds of seeds in our Super Survival Pack. The Super Survival Pack will make an enormous garden. There will be food to eat fresh, can,...
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Chili is one of those things which is made differently around the country. When my Yankee father made chili, it was really a chili sauce used like ketchup. He simmered together about equal amounts of diced tomato, onions and vinegar and added dry pepper and some diced sweet peppers. Once cooked and mashed it would fit down a funnel into ketchup or soda bottles which had been washed and scalded. We...
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All our seeds are open pollinated varieties. You can save seeds from your garden and they will grow to be the same crops. None of our seeds are Genetically Modified. None of our seeds are Hybrid. Each kind of seed I sell has been carefully chosen to be hardy, reliable and easy to grow. I do not offer seeds which will cross pollinate in our collections such as including both Beets and Swiss Chard, or...
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I have been using this huge hand powered grain mill for a few months now, and I continue to be impressed. It is large enough to quickly grind a pint and a half of corn. The handle turns more easily than any of my much smaller hand cranked mills. With smaller mills, I usually make more than one pass to keep the effort low. First I crack the kernels, then I grind it again, adjusted finer and finer....
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I have a small anodized aluminum pressure cooker but I am not completely satisfied with the idea of cooking food directly in any sort of aluminum pot. In tests that I have conducted this pressure cooker used about 1/6th the fuel needed to cook the same amount of beans or brown rice as a regular pan. Aluminum is great for all types of canners, where the food is inside a jar, and will never come in...
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I like both pumpkins and squash as Winter vegetables because they keep without canning, drying or freezing. Only a cool dry room is needed to store them. Use our Small Sugar Pumpkins first, they keep past Christmas. Waltham Butternut Squash keeps here into the early Spring. Combined you have dark orange colored vegetables for six months of the year. Squash and Pumpkins are not hard to grow...
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This fast moving storm dropped 10 inches of extremely heavy snow on us in a matter of hours. Trees still had most of their leaves. With the heavy snow clinging to them, massive numbers of branches and many whole trees fell to the ground. Damage to power lines was extensive, Our electricity was out for 8 days. Some homes in our area where out for 12. That is the longest power outage I ever experienced....
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A Pressure Canner is required for canning meats and fresh vegetables without vinegar added. Although tomatoes are thought of as a vegetable, they are technically a fruit and the older varieties contain enough acid for water bath canning. Many years ago accidents did happen with early pressure canners 'exploding' so they earned a bad reputation. More modern pressure canners have multiple safety features....
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I just returned from a delightful fishing trip with my father. My only catch was a tiny fish which I threw back into the brook and Dad didn't even get a bite. Never the less we had a pleasant morning. My father and I have fished together as far back as I can remember. Dad told me today that he started fishing in his family pond at the ripe old age of 5. Dad is now 81 years old. Now that is a lot...
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Once you have your place to garden or homestead, there are a number of kinds of food you can harvest from beds or plantings which are relatively permanent. For example, I have been cutting asparagus shoots for weeks now, and the rhubarb is ready as well. Dandelions grow wild in our lawn and fields, but if they did not we could establish a small bed just for them. You could do the same for...
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Yield: 7 Pints 7 pounds of beets 1 cup granulated white sugar 2 cups water 3 cups white vinegar Pinch of salt and pepper Scrub 7 pounds of beets and roast them in a covered roaster at 400 degrees until they can be pierced easily with a fork. This takes at least one hour. I use a brush to scrub the beets. Then pour cold water on the beets and remove the skins. Make a brine by...
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Nothing beats the wonderful taste and aroma of foods made of freshly ground grains! You will also be getting all the nutrients naturally in the food. Most whole grains contain some oils, which are removed by commercial flour makers because they spoil after milling. For example, Kernels of wheat are a good source of vitamin E, but whole wheat flour from the grocery store has that vitamin removed, so...
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The nights are getting frosty here in Southern New-England and the garden is just about ready to be put to bed for the winter. But wait there are still some beets, spinach, lettuce and turnips to harvest. These vegetables are so precious this time of the year. As I serve them for dinner I will not be tapping into my winter supplies. I also have some tiny green tomatoes that haven't had a chance to...
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Dry Beans are the best source of protein you can easily grow in your garden. In order to cook dry mature beans, they are normally soaked over night, and boiled until they are as soft as you want to serve them. This could be one or two hours, depending on what variety of bean you are cooking, and how soft you like them. Seasoning with salt, sugar or anything which contains some acid, such as tomato...
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Be sure to stop by our "Videos" and watch "Harvesting Flint Indian Corn at Seed for Security". From the home page just click on the word 'Videos' in green lettering to see a list of all of them. Our corn is ripe for the harvest. I began collecting dry ears three days ago. Around October 7th is my usual harvest date but this year the crops are about one and a half weeks early. How do you...
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When I was a young child, I found a Con-Servo Steam Canner in one of my Grandparents attics. Being curious, I had to examine it carefully and ask lots of questions. It was a large metal box with a door and two sets of shelves like an oven. In the bottom was a pan for water. I was told a lot of jars of food could be canned in this at once, using steam instead of hot water. Most people were still pumping...
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Yield: approximately 7 pints 10 cups finely chopped zucchini 4 cups finely chopped onions 1 green pepper, chopped finely 1 sweet red pepper, chopped finely 5 tablespoons pickling salt 2 1/2 cups white vinegar 1 large cayenne pepper with seeds 1 tablespoon nutmeg 1 tablespoon dry mustard 1 tablespoon turmeric 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1/2 teaspoon pepper 2 teaspoons celery salt 4 1/2 cups...
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For many years I have relied on our MEHU-LIISA steam juicer to extract the liquid goodness from all kinds of fruit and tomatoes. It came from Lehman's Hardware, where I have been a customer for nearly 40 years. The hot steam inside the unit releases the juice with out any pressing, straining, peeling or grinding. Steam transfers heat very efficiently, and the fruit is heated less than being processed...
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Sometimes called the Cole crops, this family of cold hardy vegetables also includes Kale. They readily cross pollinate, so if you want to save seeds, you MUST choose only ONE variety of ONE of these crops in the entire family. The flowers do not form to pollinate until the second year of growth. You must Winter over at least a half dozen plants from the previous year. The second year is when you have...
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I did not even sell tomato seeds at first. It is not that I don't grow and really love to eat them. Tomatoes do require starting indoors here in the North. That is not usually a project for beginning gardeners. They are very tricky because they are vulnerable to plant diseases, and need to have just the right amount of heat and water. Artificial light or a well heated greenhouse are needed too. When...
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This is my great grandmother's recipe. My family enjoys it every Spring. Salad for 4-6 people Gather a brown paper grocery bag half full of dandelions. Cut the dandelions plant just below the root. Rinse well with plenty of water. 2 cups of water 1/2 cup of cider vinegar 3/4 pound salt pork , chop finely 7 hard boiled eggs Pick over, wash, and chop dandelions. Fry salt pork until...
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We live in a time of plenty. Foods are brought to our local stores from far and wide. When times get tough, what foods will we NEED to eat? Now we often look to our garden or a produce department to provide vitamin rich fresh foods. Colorful salads look great, but we need foods which provide the energy to keep us going. Our bodies need protein to maintain them. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies won't...
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When storing seeds for many years keep them dry and cool. Suzanne Ashworth's book confirms what we have been doing for many years. "The two greatest enemies of stored seeds are high temperature and high moisture."1 and "Home-saved seeds will retain maximum vigor when thoroughly dried and stored in a moisture-proof container."1 Moisture can pass through plastic, as well as paper. The pouches that I...
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Think this couldn't happen? Think again. Supermarkets typically have only 3 days of food available. What if delivery was interrupted? This could, of course, be from a natural disaster or from a terrorist attack. The idea is to plan ahead, especially if you are like me and have many mouths to feed. O.K. So what do you do? Do not panic; think! Have at least 4 weeks of food on your shelves. By this...
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Our neighbor gave me a few dozen strawberry plants several years ago. I set out a single row, and they have been spreading over a wider area each year. Now I have a bed of strawberries 60 feet long and 15 feet wide. I pick gallons of these sweet berries, and many of them are made into jam. Bending over and picking so many berries near the ground is hard on your back, but all our children are eager...
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Few people have the luxury of enjoying an evening cup of tea by going out on their deck and collecting a handful of healthful herbs. I have a raised bed off of our deck with a melody of plants including peppermint, spearmint, and lemon balm. I use a little of each to make a delightful after-dinner beverage. These herbs, the experts say, help one to relax and also aid in the digestion of food. Perennial...
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Until a hundred years ago, the majority of Americans were farming the land for a living. Most foods were locally produced and consumed. In my home library, I have a number of market garden books written by Peter Henderson in the late 1800's. He started out growing food for the New York City market, and became an authority on the subject. Henderson bred new varieties of vegetables, and founded a large...
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I save a lot of money for other projects by buying large containers of foods, and repacking them. This article will describe a few examples. I love to add garlic to all sorts of foods, and a very inexpensive way to buy it, is chopped and dried. Garlic prepared like this will keep on the shelf for a long time, if it is protected from moisture and sunlight. We use small canning jars, and repack the large...
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When I was a young girl, Spring was ushered in with freshly caught rainbow trout and dandelion salad. My dad and I got up early on the first day of fishing season and caught our limit. Mom would have some tender young dandelions already picked over so she could put them together in a salad. Oh what a wonderful lunch that was! I still love the taste of fresh young dandelions. Picked early in the season,...
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I keep getting this question emailed to me over and over again, asked in slightly different ways. For the longest keeping seeds, five to ten years or more, I offer seeds sealed in foil pouches. This includes Our Garden Security Collection, Our Garden Bean Collection, and two small grains. Hulless Oats and Rye. These have been carefully dried and a desiccant packet has been added. They are properly...
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Carrots and parsnips are both excellent served as boiled vegetables and cooked in soups and stews. They are hearty sources of carbohydrates as well as vitamins and minerals. This is very important to anyone who is actually hungry. We live in a time when diet foods are constantly promoted for having few calories. That is good for couch potato TV watchers, and those whose life's 'work' is behind a...
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I love all the members of the onion family, and the tastes they bring to our table. Claims are made they improve our health, and help our bodies fight disease. So why aren't I selling them, you ask? Onion seed has one of the shortest lifespans of any garden seed. Germination rates fall by the second year, so it cannot be kept for long term storage, no matter what you do to preserve it. Bulbs or...
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I have a number of recipes and links about making kraut in the Simple Recipe Article. This Article is about canning the kraut for long term storage. Because of the high acid content, a pressure canner is not needed. Water bath canners are safe to use. Get your basic water bath canning methods and processing times from a source you trust, such as the USDA recommendations found in modern books. I like...
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When I was a young girl, Apricot Nectar was widely available in large cans at most grocery stores. It was a treat for us to get one to enjoy. Last year I very carefully canned many batches of peaches, and we still have plenty on the shelf. I was looking for something different to do with some of this years peach harvest. As I looked though my collection of old cooking and canning books, I found making...
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Be sure to stop by our 'Videos' in green lettering on the homepage to find "Harvesting Flint Indian Corn at Seed for Security" Flint and Dent corn are truly the King of American grains. Where ever Corn can be grown, it yields more grain from less seed. It needs fertile soil, and a good amount of water throughout the growing season. It likes at least two months of hot weather. You may have...
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I grow a wide range of plants to enhance our diet. Hops, St. John's Wort, dandelion, purple cone flower, lemon balm, burdock, thyme, rosemary, dill, parsley, sage, oregano, basil, and many kinds of mint. I also prepare Tonics which are supposed to improve our health, or help fight off disease. I am NOT making any claims that these are real Medicines. They are old fashion traditional ways of dealing...
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All fruits may be canned at home. They do not require a pressure canner, a simple water bath unit will do, or you could even use a deep kettle to process jars in. Equipment designed for the task at hand is easier to use. In the case of water bath canners, it is hard to find many kettles which cost less than a canner the same size. The most common size is for processing seven quart jars at a...
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There are many varieties of Gooseberries. The fruit of those grown in England can be much larger than our US varieties. They do well in our colder Northern states, and different kinds mature to be red, yellow or green. They tend to be rich in pectin, and a jelly recipe for half raspberries and half gooseberries needs no pectin added to set. By growing gooseberries, you can save on buying liquid pectin...
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Raspberry juice is quick and easy to make with a steam juicer. The steam simply bursts the little cells of the berry, and out runs the precious juice. It is hot and ready to be sealed in sterile bottles, where it will keep on the shelf indefinitely. The lids and containers do need to be washed and then sterilized in boiling water, or use the oven for the jars or bottles. The juice from Raspberries...
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There are two common animals raised for milk, the cow and the goat. Either one will require you to milk your animal twice a day for most of the year. It is a huge investment of your time, and they must be milked the same times EACH day. They will get to know you, and many dairy animals in small herds simply will not let anyone else milk them. The milk must be cooled promptly, and everything it comes...
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My second choice for livestock at home is to buy 2 or more piglets, and raise them to butchering weight. That is around 220 pounds live weight today. Larger weights will have more fat, but not that much more meat on them. Piglets will weigh about 35-40 pounds when you buy them at 6-8 weeks of age. They should be ready for slaughter when they are about 5 months old, so you will have them for around...
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If you are thinking about keeping any type of livestock, I would start off with a flock of hens. They will require less time and expense than any other animals you might raise. This article is to let you know the considerations about keeping a home flock of Chickens. It is meant to help you decide if you would want to have your very own fresh eggs, and fertile manure for your garden. Some may even...
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Our Economy is highly specialized. People work at jobs to provide products and services for some small and often distant market. Most of what we buy has come great distances and is a part of International trade. We rely heavily on oil, but don't produce or refine enough for our own country. In tougher times, people had to go back to using what was locally produced. Centuries ago, any imported item...
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Nan's favorite Bread and Butter Pickle Recipe- 3 Quarts Cucumbers 1 Quart Sweet Peppers 6 Onions 20 Whole Cloves of Garlic 1/2 cup Pickling Salt Slice the cucumbers , peppers and onions into thin slices. mix with salt and garlic. Cover with ice and let stand for 3 hours under a cloth. Then make pickling solution as follows Bring to boil- 3 cups cider vinegar 4 cups sugar 1...
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My seed collections come sealed in aluminum coated vapor barrier bags. Inside the pouches are a desiccant packet to absorb excess moisture. Our seed collections and grains should keep for 5 to 10 years because I seal and protect them. My collections may be safely stored in your refrigerator or freezer for even longer storage. If you choose to refrigerate or freeze the seed collections, be sure...
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Beans are the most important single garden crop. Once fully mature, they provide protein. Peas and lentils are part of the same family too. I like both of those, but I'd much rather choose from the milder beans to eat every day. They are all Legumes, which means they can use Nitrogen from the air to make protein. Other vegetables or grains can't do that. Peanuts, clover and alfalfa are in the Legume...
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These are ideal crops to grow because they are so easy to keep in a cool dry place. For back room storage, select sound fruit, free of surface damage. Let it cure in a sunny but dry place, such as a porch or car port. Later, If your house is still too warm, a dry barn or shed is fine until colder weather. Then you can safely bring them inside. During this whole process, protect them from freezing....
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I offer the finest open pollinated garden and grain seeds. None of my seeds are genetically modified. They are time tested varieties with proven reliability. I have many years of experience saving seeds. I have selected the most important varieties to choose from. How did I determine which foods are the most important? The first criterion is to select varieties which are reliable every year, and...
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I produce a fine tasting apple juice in my Mehu-Liisa steam extractor. It tastes more like cider, and is fairly thick and very rich in flavor. For drinking, I dilute it with an equal amount of water. It is also great to add when roasting pork, and can be added to baked goods for extra flavor and nutrition. It is bottled hot, and keeps indefinitely right on the shelf, like any other canned good. ...
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Spelt is a high protein grain, which tastes fairly similar to whole wheat. I have grown the grain here several different years, but I have not found an efficient, home scale way to thresh bushels of it. It is very low in gluten, so it will not rise much with yeast, and some of the people who can't eat wheat, are able to enjoy spelt. Here is my slow cooker recipe for a small loaf of spelt bread. ...
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All freshly ground grains taste much better, and corn is no exception. The natural oils and vitamins are at their peak of perfection. Flavors normally lost in processing give a rich and full bodied aroma. This is how I make fresh cornbread, and bake it in a 'Crock-Pot' or slow cooker. For everyday convenience, I use an electric powered mill to grind the grains, and mix the dough. That takes less than...
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Beans, corn, squash and pumpkins all require a location which is sunny all day long. The ground should be loosened well below, and fertilizer or rich compost mixed in. For a new garden, dig or loosen all the soil which will be directly under the mature bean or corn plants. With squash and pumpkins, work up an area 30 inches across. Cut and remove any roots you find in that soil. In an established...
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The easiest to grow, starchy vegetable is the Jerusalem Artichoke. This vigorous relative of sunflower, tobacco, tomato, and potato is a member of the Nightshade family. It is raised to produce eatable roots. It is started from root cuttings, like potatoes, and forms tubers in the fall. Your first harvest can begin after the tops die back for winter. Dig in spots scattered throughout the bed....
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I want to grow the very best animal or plant I can, adapted to my own needs. With vegetables, an early large crop is usually the best eating, and what you will want to be preserving also. You want to have enough to fill your drying racks, dehydrator, or canning kettle FULL several times. My pressure and water bath canners are the common size, and take 7 quarts or 10 pints in each batch. An excellent...
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Even with only a relatively small area to work with, much of our food can be grown at home. This is how to start. You should have a very short list of foods you absolutely will not eat, or are allergic to. Remember, freshly harvested foods all taste much better than anything you can buy. Your goal is to be harvesting a reasonably balanced diet as many months out of the year as possible and to store...
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Most people eat far more starchy foods than meats or vegetables. Wheat, Rice, Corn, Potatoes and Beans have been the foundation of many cultures. These are field crops that don't require the attention of vegetables, but will need several times as much space to grow a year's supply. Your local climate will determine which ones you can grow. I'd try to find out what the native peoples and early settlers...
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Be sure to stop by our 'Videos' section by clicking on that word in green lettering on our homepage. There you can see 'Harvesting Flint Indian Corn at Seed for Security' and all the rest of our informative videos. Part 1 - Selecting the type to grow Anywhere field corn can be grown; it is usually the most important crop. Farmers love it for animal feed. Let's take a close look at home production...
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You can only learn what crops will do well in your own garden by experimenting. Try a small area of several varieties and pay close attention to how much work they are to take care of, how well they yield, and how well you like the taste of them. To me, the most important crop is dry baking beans, because they are high in protein. We let the string beans fully mature and dry, after several pickings,...
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For working your vegetable garden and field crops you will need good quality tools, designed for each task. I sometimes don't realize how big a difference it makes to have the right tool. It also needs to be of the correct weight and size, to do the job efficiently. If you are not certain which one to choose, bring several, and see which one is easier to work with. Once in the garden, sometimes...
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Asparagus is an ideal crop to grow because it is harvested after the spinach I have Wintered over but before Spring sown spinach and lettuce are ready. Instead of eating stored vegetables during this time, you can be eating fresh. It is also grown in a permanent bed, and only needs attention at certain times of the year, so it is ideal to establish at a remote retreat. Starting asparagus from...
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